Kurt Schwitters: Timeline

This is a timeline poster I made in my Applications in Print Publishing class. It outlines Kurt Schwitters’ accomplishments and innovations to design.

For this project, I played with Schwitters’ collage style while also retaining a traditional timeline feel.

Kurt Schwitters Timeline (Click the link for the full-sized .pdf)

Screen shot 2016-01-19 at 4.49.57 PM

 

 

Food blog revival

I’m bringing my food blog back to life. After I went abroad I tried to keep it alive but was too busy with all of my school work and trying to graduate. Now that I have more time, I’m going to be blogging about food through photography, experimental recipes and my dining adventures.

Right now I’m volunteering at a farm in central Maine, so stay tuned for pics of freshly picked, organic goods.

Also, for anyone who already follows, I changed the url so it’s not just about me being abroad. Just a heads up: http://eating-myway-throughlife.tumblr.com/

Radio Clips

Here are some clips from my radio journalism class, Spring ’15 at Emerson College:

WERS 88.9FM Packages

Over my Fall ’14 semester at Emerson College, I worked for WERS 88.9FM. I worked specifically on the public affairs show called You Are Here contributing a package almost every other week related to the show’s changing weekly theme. Unfortunately, they haven’t uploaded anything recently to their SoundCloud page so here are my clips that aired on WERS (Note: these have already aired on the station and do not cover recent news):

I want to add that working for WERS was an awesome experience and has opened my eyes to the world of radio journalism, which I found out I really enjoy. I hope to continue with the station next semester as well.

Update: WERS has uploaded these clips: herehere and here.

Tales of a Feminist Porn Critic

By Alexandra Fileccia

Her latest blog post reads, “You guys. You guys. Oh my god, you guys. My brain is a whirling, whorling mass of confusion right now. Because DRONE BONING has apparently arrived. And yes, it is porn filmed by a drone.” Lynsey G is probably among a small percentage of women interested in advancements in the porn industry. And that’s because 31-year-old Lynsey writes about feminist porn and sex-positive feminism, a niche she’s made her own.

Lynsey freelances and works a romance-novel editing job to pay the bills. She got her “big break” writing reviews for adult entertainment films—and by “big break” I mean a writing job that pays well for minimal work (hard to come by in the writing and publishing industries) and provides a place to be published, even if by a ridiculous penname. However, she was quick to realize that reviewing porn movies wasn’t as glamorous at it initially sounded. “I came to [my job] thinking this would be really cool. I thought, ‘I’ll be the coolest person anybody knows because I’m reviewing porn,’” she says. But while watching films over the course of that job, she realized there were no plots and just hardcore, focused-on-straight-cis-male-viewers, porn. It was not as cool as she thought she was going to be.

Starting out with pornography sparked her interest in studying women and how they are treated in our society. She says, “My feminism wasn’t fully developed until later in life.” She graduated from Fordham University, a historically Jesuit school, so there were no gender classes or sex and sexuality classes. She studied writing, literature and philosophy which Lynsey says were mostly centered on religious texts and teachings. “I don’t think I’m one of their favorite alumni,” Lynsey says in gest. “Most of my publications are not going to go in the alumni bulletin. It’s a shame, I’m doing great stuff!”

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Breaking Bread

Award Winning Bricco Panetteria (Published in Scene magazine)

By Alexandra Fileccia

Hidden down an alleyway off of Hanover Street in the North End lies Bricco Panetteria. Follow the stairs down and you’ll enter into the cozy bakeshop. On your right stands a tall rack filled with dozens of loaves of bread. On the counter in front of you sits fresh croissants and sandwich bread. The buzz of busy bakers fills your ears as they make the day’s supply of bread. The panetteria has received nothing but praise since its opening about four years ago.

The bakery takes the title of “Best bakery/bread” for the second year in a row in Boston Magazine’s “Best of Boston” issue. The Panetteria was also mentioned in the August 2014 issue of Bon Appétit. Owner Frank DePasquale initially opened the bakery to supply his own bread to his restaurants. Now, anyone can stop by for a loaf of bread.

With new head baker Antonio Follico and a new variety of breads including polenta bread, truffle bread and sesame bread, Bricco is bringing a fresh taste while staying close to tradition. “We like to play with the recipes,” says Antonio, “People like to try something different.” Antonio worked his way up in the panetteria, and with his experience and new responsibilities he plans to change things up a bit.

The ingredients and passion that goes into creating the bread make it so desirable. Bricco uses minimal ingredients such as unbleached, unbromated enriched wheat flour and organic wheat flour, water and salt. Antonio’s favorite breads are Olive Ciabatta and Prosciutto and Parmesan Ciabatta, two of the bakery’s popular loaves. The panetteria is open everyday from 8am to 11pm. If you haven’t already, head down Bricco Place and grab yourself a loaf.

A Transformation in Rock and Roll

By Alexandra Fileccia

“Moonage Daydream,” the third track on The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars (1972), tells the story of an alien-messiah who shows potential in saving the human race, or so the theories say. All of the songs on Ziggy contribute to the overall concept of the album: Alien life forms serve as the only hope for Earth and the human race to survive.

At the end of the Space Race in 1971, David Bowie gave alien birth to the song “Moonage Daydream.” With its far-out lyrics and space-like production techniques, Bowie takes his listeners to another planet, which fits the generation of spacy coke freaks through the 70s, like Bowie himself. Bowie transcended the precedents of rock and roll with his glam rock appearance and obsession with space exploration. In a way, Bowie who started as an outsider to the genre, created a musical niche where he could finally belong.

Enter Bowie’s alter ego: Ziggy Stardust, the album’s main character. As a human in contact with aliens, Ziggy seems the most likely to save to world—a sort of angel on Earth. Throughout the album he transforms into a rock star. This Ziggy persona gave a new face to rock and roll. It challenged the way white artists played black music, and in a way, made rock and roll sound even more foreign—from another world. “Moonage Daydream” shamelessly and consciously exists as white music; he doesn’t even try to sound black, as Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones famously did.

As Bowie’s early alter ego (he later plays the role of Aladdin Sane among others), Ziggy Stardust fuses “the sci-fi futurism of writers like William Burroughs and JG Ballard with a hard-rock sound and a transsexual campery borrowed from Lou Reed,” says Sean O’Hagan in his Guardian review of the book Moonage Daydream: The Life and Times of Ziggy Stardust. Bowie playing the role of the album’s character created a new way to experience and think about rock and roll. He did not have his own style (previous and future albums sound totally different, some even play with different genres); in fact, putting on a show and acting as his made-up character became his style. “And that self-conscious sense of theater is part of the reason why Ziggy Stardust sounds so foreign,” says Stephen Thomas Erlewine in his review of the album on allmusic.com. Bowie laces his lyrics with vocal theatrics in the style of Ziggy Stardust.

The opening lyrics strike right at the beginning of “Moonage Daydream” after a few powerful guitar strums and drum hits. Bowie confidently declares, “I’m an alligator, I’m a mama-papa coming for you.” On the word “you” he trails off with an exaggerated vibrato, which simulates a falling feel. “I’m the space invader, I’ll be a rock ‘n’ rollin’ bitch for you.” Under this line, an acoustic guitar holds rhythm while the bass grooves along. The combination of acoustic and electric guitar in this song, in addition to Bowie eclectic voice, creates a modernized folkie feel. However, the way he shouts the next lyric and the bizarre image it creates, “Keep your mouth shut, you’re squawking like a pink monkey bird/And I’m busting up my brains for the words,” stays true to Bowie’s over-the-top stage persona, completely opposite of the folkie aesthetic.

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Basket Case

Packing the Perfect Picnic Feast

Published in SCENE Magazine

By Alexandra Fileccia


 

The birds are chirping, the sun is shining, and Boston is bustling with tourists—summer is finally here. And I have one word for you: picnics. Share a meal with friends, family and Mother Nature. Or make it a romantic date along the Charles River with someone special. Pick a spot, whether it be the Lewis Wharf, Corey Hill Outlook or even Boston Common, and get settled.

The spot where you set your blanket is important, but the food in your basket is the heart of your picnic. Pack your favorite salads, sandwiches and burgers. Need inspiration? See what famous chefs from around Boston would pack in their baskets.

Jasper White
Summer Shack
“Fried chicken and some potato salad. Mostly just fried chicken, it’s my favorite.”

Dante de Magistris
Dante, Il Casale
“That’s easy, left over pasta. I always associate picnics or the beach with tuna spaghetti. It’s really good cold. It’s a light tomato sauce with tuna, anchovy and parsley. Also something refreshing like cut up pieces of jicama with lime chili salt. And of course some wine or a margarita in a pitcher.”

Jose Duarte
Taranta
“A French baguette with Mortadella, grapes and a piece of Crucolo cheese. And, of course, some Prosecco.”

Lucas Sousa
Beacon Hill Hotel & Bistro
“Something easy to eat while sitting out. Meats and cheeses for a sandwich, and some fruit.”

Ian Just
Society on High
“I would have to say our Cobb Salad; nicely grilled chicken on top of mixed greens, blue cheese, bacon pieces, hard cooked egg, and avocado. Perfect for a picnic.”

Bill Poirier
Sonsie
“An Asian picnic basket. Premixed Mai Tai with plenty of crushed ice. A sesame lobster salad roll, cold, Sriracha fried chicken, miso veggie slaw and brownies with crystalized ginger. Did I say plenty of Mai Tai?”

Paul Wahlberg
Alma Nove, Wahlburgers
“A six pack of Coca-Cola, pork cutlet sandwiches from my father’s recipe, homemade potato salad and roasted ears of corn.”

“Vow” by Sales

A short review I wrote!

Five Cent Sound

saless

By Alexandra Fileccia

Take the sounds of Lenka and Tegan & Sara, add a hint of Churchill and a pinch of The xx, melt them down into one, and you get Sales’s new single, “Vow.” There’s a familiarity to the song; it sits on the tip of your tongue, but you can’t quite put a name to it. That’s what makes “Vow” so appealing to the ears.

“Vow” starts out with a slow, somber guitar progression then quickly picks up with a bouncy beat. The catchy guitar riffs will have you bopping your head from side to side as Lauren Morgan sings, “Looked at you too long at last/ Fell apart in the lows of a laugh/ In those times you will vow (you will vow)/ That’s why you try to quit thinking aloud.” The lyrics have a darker sentiment than the up-beat guitar; they embody the feeling of being…

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“Singles” by Future Islands

My latest review is up on the Five Cent Sound magazine blog! Stay tuned for more awesome reviews this summer!

Five Cent Sound

LP_lores

By Alexandra Fileccia

Baltimore’s new-wave trio Future Islands released their new album worldwide on March 25. Recently recorded on the famed indie label 4AD, Singles celebrates the band’s debut to their new career direction. The band, previously signed to Thrill Jockey, found a balance in Singles between a mainstream indie sound and their usual eccentric, soulful sound. Some may call it selling out because of the upbeat tempos and overall pop feel, but it’s a new take on Future Islands’s already distinguished sound. And it’s something worth taking a closer listen to.

Singles pulls from images of nature to create one long, emotional poem. The progression of tracks on Singles tells the story of a breakup. The album takes the listeners on a date with heartbreak that most of us are familiar with and afterwards leaves us to reminisce.

The album opens with “Seasons (Waiting on You).” The leading track…

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