Tales of a Feminist Porn Critic

By Alexandra Fileccia

Her latest blog post reads, “You guys. You guys. Oh my god, you guys. My brain is a whirling, whorling mass of confusion right now. Because DRONE BONING has apparently arrived. And yes, it is porn filmed by a drone.” Lynsey G is probably among a small percentage of women interested in advancements in the porn industry. And that’s because 31-year-old Lynsey writes about feminist porn and sex-positive feminism, a niche she’s made her own.

Lynsey freelances and works a romance-novel editing job to pay the bills. She got her “big break” writing reviews for adult entertainment films—and by “big break” I mean a writing job that pays well for minimal work (hard to come by in the writing and publishing industries) and provides a place to be published, even if by a ridiculous penname. However, she was quick to realize that reviewing porn movies wasn’t as glamorous at it initially sounded. “I came to [my job] thinking this would be really cool. I thought, ‘I’ll be the coolest person anybody knows because I’m reviewing porn,’” she says. But while watching films over the course of that job, she realized there were no plots and just hardcore, focused-on-straight-cis-male-viewers, porn. It was not as cool as she thought she was going to be.

Starting out with pornography sparked her interest in studying women and how they are treated in our society. She says, “My feminism wasn’t fully developed until later in life.” She graduated from Fordham University, a historically Jesuit school, so there were no gender classes or sex and sexuality classes. She studied writing, literature and philosophy which Lynsey says were mostly centered on religious texts and teachings. “I don’t think I’m one of their favorite alumni,” Lynsey says in gest. “Most of my publications are not going to go in the alumni bulletin. It’s a shame, I’m doing great stuff!”

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Basket Case

Packing the Perfect Picnic Feast

Published in SCENE Magazine

By Alexandra Fileccia


 

The birds are chirping, the sun is shining, and Boston is bustling with tourists—summer is finally here. And I have one word for you: picnics. Share a meal with friends, family and Mother Nature. Or make it a romantic date along the Charles River with someone special. Pick a spot, whether it be the Lewis Wharf, Corey Hill Outlook or even Boston Common, and get settled.

The spot where you set your blanket is important, but the food in your basket is the heart of your picnic. Pack your favorite salads, sandwiches and burgers. Need inspiration? See what famous chefs from around Boston would pack in their baskets.

Jasper White
Summer Shack
“Fried chicken and some potato salad. Mostly just fried chicken, it’s my favorite.”

Dante de Magistris
Dante, Il Casale
“That’s easy, left over pasta. I always associate picnics or the beach with tuna spaghetti. It’s really good cold. It’s a light tomato sauce with tuna, anchovy and parsley. Also something refreshing like cut up pieces of jicama with lime chili salt. And of course some wine or a margarita in a pitcher.”

Jose Duarte
Taranta
“A French baguette with Mortadella, grapes and a piece of Crucolo cheese. And, of course, some Prosecco.”

Lucas Sousa
Beacon Hill Hotel & Bistro
“Something easy to eat while sitting out. Meats and cheeses for a sandwich, and some fruit.”

Ian Just
Society on High
“I would have to say our Cobb Salad; nicely grilled chicken on top of mixed greens, blue cheese, bacon pieces, hard cooked egg, and avocado. Perfect for a picnic.”

Bill Poirier
Sonsie
“An Asian picnic basket. Premixed Mai Tai with plenty of crushed ice. A sesame lobster salad roll, cold, Sriracha fried chicken, miso veggie slaw and brownies with crystalized ginger. Did I say plenty of Mai Tai?”

Paul Wahlberg
Alma Nove, Wahlburgers
“A six pack of Coca-Cola, pork cutlet sandwiches from my father’s recipe, homemade potato salad and roasted ears of corn.”

Is gluten free the way to be?

Read this article in the Health section of Atlas Magazine’s New Renaissance issue!

By Alexandra Fileccia

From pizza to canned baked beans, sausages to fried foods, we live in a gluten saturated world. We pour our dressing on our salads without noticing the wheat added for thickness, or we drink a glass of root beer overlooking that the ingredient modified food starch is derived from wheat. Wheat, rye, and barley, all of which contain the protein gluten, can be found in most meals in the typical American diet, which makes it difficult for people living with a gluten allergy, gluten intolerance, or Celiac Disease.

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Muse: The 2nd Law

Published in Five Cent Sound magazine (formerly Chaos magazine).

By Alexandra Fileccia

After premiering their Olympic anthem “Survival” in London this summer, English rock trio Muse released their sixth studio album The 2nd Law. The title of the album refers the second law of thermodynamics which drummer Dominic Howard described in an interview with BBC as “The theory that all energy as we know it—in ourselves, on this planet, in the universe—is essentially running out and cooling down and dispersing.”

The album opens with the thick chugging of heavy bass in “Supremacy.” This military march echoes how people are sick of the spiraling economic situation. “Policies, have risen up and overcome the brave/ Greatness dies, unsung and lost, invisible to history,” yells lead singer Matthew Bellamy in the second and third lines of the song. It is definitely a song appropriate for before an epic fight scene in a movie—inspiration for revolution. If you listen carefully, the faint whisper of the 007 theme song can be heard under the distorted guitar solo, adding to the suspense.

Economic turmoil is the main theme threaded through each track on the album. In “Animals,” Bellamy calls out big business saying, “Crush those who beg at your feet/ Analyse, franchise, spread out/Kill the competition/And buy yourself an ocean.” The song then ends with sounds of a rioting mob.

The following track “Explorer” channels Freddie Mercury combining “Don’t Stop Me Now” and “Bohemian Rhapsody”-like melodies that take a chill pill after the angsty “Animals.” The repetition of the line “There’s nothing left for you or for me” follows up on the evil corporate world mentioned in the previous song. In the chorus, Bellamy asks the listener to free him from this world. It is clear that the lead singer is not content in the pessimism he is surrounded by so he is asking for a change in policy—an improvement in the quality of life.

Bellamy, Howard and guitarist Christopher Wolstenholme lay down the funk in “Big Freeze.” Though lurking with gloom, the song bounces with the staple funk and a melody that reflects the sound of their previous album Resistance. “Panic Station,” another groovy track, pushes forward with its Michael Jacksonesque bass line. The chorus mimics the melody of the beginning verses in “Thriller.”

The pop-rock single “Madness” takes a little from the electronic world with its wobble bass though I would certainly not call it dubstep. It’s very minimal compared to the apocalyptic, showy sound the band is known for. If you’re looking for a song to pin as dubstep, “The 2nd Law: Unsustainable” would be just that. This song used in their album preview video explains what the second law of thermodynamics in a creepy, robotic female voice before it goes into a drop of grinds and warps of machines. This song sums up the entire album in just its name—the notion that the world we live in today is unsustainable and is heading toward its doom.

The 2nd Law is a step in a new direction for the English trio. Yes, it is different than previous albums and may be seen as “selling out” due to electronic influences and if it’s old school charm, why would they be selling out?, however the album is powerful nonetheless. The compilation of songs captures the “end of the world” attitude that the second law of thermodynamics theorizes. If we don’t make a change now, then Earth is headed toward its end—that is what The 2nd Law is all about.

CSD Awareness Event provides students with a dose of perspective

CSD Awareness Event provides students with a dose of perspective
By Alexandra Fileccia/Beacon Correspondent
March 28, 2012 at 11:02 pm

A student mouthed “hello” as an electrolarynx vibrated against his neck, making the word faintly audible and slightly robotic. His facial expression mirrored the weird sensation of the device as it picked up the vibrations in his throat. The device allows users to see what it is like to communicate after having ones larynx removed due to throat cancer.

This was the first thing onlookers saw at the Communication Sciences and Disorders Awareness event last Thursday in Piano Row’s Multipurpose room. Students made their way through a crowd of 30 starting at the vocal hygiene table, then making their way to the remaining three tables to learn about transgender voice and gay lisps, accent reduction and modification, and hearing loss and prevention.

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Literary magazine hosts launch-party spelling bee

Literary magazine hosts launch-party spelling bee website.
By Alexandra Fileccia / Beacon Correspondent
February 23, 2012 at 12:50 am

The audience grew silent as freshman Mackenzie Kuester approached the microphone.

“Platypus. P-l-a-t-y-p-u-s. Platypus.”

She passed the first round of Stork Magazine’s second annual spelling bee.

“I got it right,” the writing, literature, and publishing major said, “which made me feel confident heading into the second round.”

The night of spelling served as a launch party for a book of six short-shorts — stories under four pages in length — Stork hoped to publish last semester but postponed due to layout and design issues, according to Sean Mackey, editor-in-chief of the literary magazine.

The senior writing, literature, and publishing major said the event was also to inform students that Stork is currently taking submissions for another collection of short fiction, this time with a 30 page maximum.

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